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Design Improvement of a Polymer-Based Tendon-Driven Wearable Robotic Hand (Exo-Glove Poly)

  • Haemin Lee
  • Brian Byunghyun Kang
  • Hyunki In
  • Kyu-Jin ChoEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Biosystems & Biorobotics book series (BIOSYSROB, volume 16)

Abstract

This paper presents the design improvement of a polymer-based tendon-driven wearable robotic hand, Exo-Glove Poly. The wearability and adaptiveness are the key points to design the Exo-Glove Poly in considering the cases of practical use. Thus, magnets are embedded into the wearable part for easy donning and doffing. Also, the tendon length adjustment mechanism is designed to adapt different hand sizes by changing length of the tendons. Through these improvements, it is increased the change to practical use of the Exo-Glove Poly.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haemin Lee
    • 1
  • Brian Byunghyun Kang
    • 1
  • Hyunki In
    • 1
  • Kyu-Jin Cho
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Biorobotics Lab of Seoul National UniversitySeoulKorea

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