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How We Learn at the Digital Workplace

Chapter

Abstract

Research on learning at the workplace significantly grew over the past few years. A trending theme within research on learning at the workplace is an emphasis on digital learning. Digital learning is defined as any set of technology-based methods that can be applied to support learning processes. For corporate organisations, digital technologies enable the implementation of customised learning environments even on small scale. Access to digital technologies changes learning at the workplace through cost-effective delivery modes, easy to access leaning resources, and flexible learning environments. Still, research in digital workplace learning and how digital technologies can bridge formal and informal learning at the workplace is scarce. Therefore, this edited volume Digital Workplace Learning aims to provide insight into how digital technologies may bridge and enhance formal and informal workplace learning.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MannheimMannheimGermany

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