Skip to main content

Education for Sustainable Development in the Namibian Biology Curriculum

  • 365 Accesses

Part of the Schooling for Sustainable Development book series (SSDE)

Abstract

As a response to the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, Namibia has incorporated Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) into its education policy. There has thus been a growing recognition of the significance of ESD across the school curriculum. However, of the various subjects taught in secondary schools, science subjects (especially biology) are often perceived as subjects that can make a significant contribution to ESD. Drawing on research that was conducted at three schools in Windhoek, this chapter will comment critically on the uptake of ESD in the Biology Namibian Senior Secondary Certificate (NSSC) curriculum. The chapter reflects on the influence of learner-centred education in the Namibian curriculum, the challenges and successes of ESD integration in the biology curriculum and how ESD has potential to strengthen and expand policies on learner-centred education, helping to translate them into practices.

Keywords

  • Critical Thinking
  • School Curriculum
  • Biology Teacher
  • Environmental Topic
  • Curriculum Policy

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-45989-9_8
  • Chapter length: 12 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-45989-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    The research has been written up as a master’s thesis (Tshiningayamwe 2011).

References

  • Bones, B. (1994). Getting started. A guide to bringing environmental education into your classroom. Washington, DC: The National Environmental Education and Training Foundation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dahlstrom, L. (1995). Teacher education for independent Namibia: From the liberation struggle to a national agenda. Journal of Education for Teaching, 21, 273–288.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dawe, G., Jucker, R., & Martin, S. (2005). Sustainable development in higher education: Current practice and future developments a report for the higher education academy. Heslington, NY: Higher Education Academy.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dreyer, J., & Loubser, C. (2005). Curriculum development, teaching and learning for the environment. In C. P. Loubser (Ed.), Environmental education: Some South African perspectives (pp. 127–153). Cape Town, South Africa: Van Schaik.

    Google Scholar 

  • Enviroteach. (1995). Investigating of opportunities for the implementation of Enviroteach programmes in Namibia colleges of education. Windhoek, Namibia: DRFN.

    Google Scholar 

  • Enviroteach. (1998). The pilot phase, reflections on exploring mechanisms for integrating learner-centred cross-curricular, activities based environmental education into basic education in Namibia. Windhoek, Namibia: DRFN.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ferreira, J., Ryan, L., & Tilbury, D. (2007). Mainstreaming education for sustainable development in initial teacher education in Australia: A review of existing professional development model. Journal of Education for Teaching: International Research and Pedagogy, 3(2), 225–239.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fröhlich, G. (2006). Namibian environmental education certificate. Module 1. Study guide. Windhoek, Namibia: Centre for open and lifelong learning, Polytechnic of Namibia.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haindongo, N. (2013). Environmental Education in Namibia: A case study of the Biology teachers. Unpublished master’s thesis, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haingura, R. (2009). Enhancing learner centred education through the Eco-school framework: Case studies of Eco-schools practice in South Africa and Namibia. Unpublished master’s thesis, Rhodes University, Grahamstown.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hoabes, R. (2004). Investigating teaching strategies used by teachers to foster environmental learning in the Namibian Life Science curriculum. Unpublished master’s thesis, Rhodes University, Grahamstown.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hogan, R. (2008). Contextualizing formal education for improved relevance: A case from the Rufiji wetlands, Tanzania. Southern African Journal of Environmental Education, 25, 44–56.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kanyimba, A.T. (2002). Towards the incorporation of Environmental Education in the Namibian Secondary School Curriculum. Unpublished master’s thesis, UNISA, Pretoria.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kanyimba, A., Hamunyela, M., & Kasanda, C. D. (2014). Barriers to the implementation of Education for Sustainable Development in Namibia’s higher education institutions. Creative Education, 5, 242–252.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kristensen, J. O., & Andersen, H. M. (2001). Life science project 1991-2000. Educational reform in Namibia: Changing the way we teach, learn and live. Windhoek, Namibia: Capital Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lotz-Sisitka, H. (2002). Curriculum patterning in environmental education: A review of developments in formal education in South Africa. In J. Hattingh, H. Lotz-Sisitka, & R. O’Donoghue (Eds.), Environmental education, ethics and action in Southern Africa (pp. 97–120). Pretoria, South Africa: Environmental Education Association of Southern Africa/Human Sciences Research Council.

    Google Scholar 

  • Namibia. Ministry of Education. (2009). The national curriculum for basic education. Okahandja, Namibia: NIED.

    Google Scholar 

  • Namibia. Ministry of Education and Culture. (1993). Toward education for all: A developmental brief for education, culture and training. Windhoek, Namibia: Gamsberg Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Namibia. Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (2002). Atlas of Namibia. Windhoek, Namibia: Directorate of Environmental Affairs.

    Google Scholar 

  • Namibia. Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (2006). Vital signs of Namibia 2004. An integrated state of the environment report. Windhoek, Namibia: Directorate of Environmental Affairs.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Donoghue, R. (2015). Environment and sustainability education: Quality teaching in relation to human conduct and the common good. BEd Honours environmental education elective. Grahamstown, UK: Environmental Learning and Research Centre, Rhodes University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Republic of Namibia. (2009–2014). Education for Sustainable Development strategy 2009–2014. Namibia: Windhoek.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shulman, L. (2004). Teaching as community property. Essays on higher education. San Francisco: Jossey Bass Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Support Environmental Education in Namibia (SEEN). (2005). Education for sustainable development in Namibia: The experience of SEEN: past responses and future directions. Windhoek, Namibia: SEEN.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tshiningayamwe, S. A. N. (2011). Implementation of Environmental Learning in the NSSC Biology curriculum Component: A case study of Namibia. Unpublished master’s thesis, Rhodes University, Grahamstown.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNEP. (2006). Education for sustainable development innovations – programmes for universities in Africa. Howick, New Zealand: Share-Net.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNESCO. (2005). Education for all: The quality imperative. EFA Global monitoring report. Paris: UNESCO.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNESCO. (2008). Ahmedabad Declaration 2007: A call to action education for life: Life through education (Report by deputy general on the follow-up to decisions and resolutions adopted by the executive board and the general conference at the previous sessions). Paris: UNESCO.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNESCO. (2012). The education for sustainable development sourcebook. Education for sustainable development in action learning and training tools (Vol. 4). Paris: UNESCO.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNESCO. (2015). Framework for Action Education 2030: Towards inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning for all (DRAFT). Paris: UNESCO.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wood, D. R. (2007). Professional learning communities: Teachers, knowledge, and knowing. Theory Into Practice, 46(4), 281–290.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sirkka Tshiningayamwe .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2017 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Tshiningayamwe, S. (2017). Education for Sustainable Development in the Namibian Biology Curriculum. In: Lotz-Sisitka, H., Shumba, O., Lupele, J., Wilmot, D. (eds) Schooling for Sustainable Development in Africa. Schooling for Sustainable Development. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45989-9_8

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45989-9_8

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-45987-5

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-45989-9

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)