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Abstract: Words Have Meaning and Names Have Power—Assessing the Appeal of Personalization of Perceiving One’s Own Name on Coke Bottles

  • Sascha Langner
  • Steffen Schmidt
  • Nadine Hennigs
  • Evmorfia Karampournioti
  • Levke Albertsen
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science book series (DMSPAMS)

Abstract

Based on the main idea to put ones first name on a coke bottle, Coca-Cola’s “Share a Coke” campaign has since spread to currently more than 80 countries across the globe. And many other brands followed by also printing first names on their product packages (like Nutella or Langnese), although it is still unclear what drives the success of Coca Cola’s campaign in particular. In order to examine Coca-Cola’s campaign from a holistic consumer behavior perspective, the focus of the present study is on the assessment of (positive and negative) explicit and implicit consumer reactions. In this context, the following research questions are investigated: What is the impact of a personalized product packaging with regard to customer’s explicit and implicit brand-related associations? Are the explicit and implicit effects of different brand assessments influenced by different degrees of brand consciousness? An experimental study was conducted to measure the product-related explicit and implicit brand assessments. In the study a self-report questionnaire and a reaction time measurement (SC-IAT) was used. In January 2015 over 228 consumers participated. In order to test the main hypotheses, mean and group comparisons were applied. Our results reveal that for customers with a high brand consciousness, Coca-Cola’s product personalization positively affects attitudinal brand assessment on an explicit and implicit level. The opposite effect was shown for customers with low levels of brand consciousness toward Coca-Cola: Here the personalized product design evoked negative attitudinal associations on an automatic and impulsive information processing level.

Keywords

Consumer Behavior Processing Level Follow Research Question Customer Relationship Management Customer Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References available upon request.

Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sascha Langner
    • 1
  • Steffen Schmidt
    • 1
  • Nadine Hennigs
    • 1
  • Evmorfia Karampournioti
    • 1
  • Levke Albertsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Leibniz University of HannoverHannoverGermany

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