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Transferring Learning Across Safety-Critical Industries

Abstract

Safety has proved a strong driver for transferring learning across industrial sectors. Nowhere is this more evident than in safety-critical industries such as maritime. This chapter interrogates two dominant existing approaches to transfer and examines a number of case studies of tools and techniques that have been transferred across safety-critical industries. The challenges of these transfer projects are explored, together with some lessons learned. In addition a new, systematic approach to transfer is described, before the chapter concludes with a discussion of possible future directions for transferring learning to the maritime sector.

Keywords

  • Learning
  • Knowledge
  • Transfer
  • Sector
  • Safety
  • Safety-critical
  • Transport
  • Resilience
  • Culture
  • Safety maturity
  • Regulation

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Fig. 1

Notes

  1. 1.

    ACROSS is a Large-Scale Integrating Project funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013). Grant Agreement n° ACP2-GA-2012-314501.

  2. 2.

    Funded under the EC Leonardo Da Vinci programme. See for more details: https://www.tcd.ie/cihs/trainingconsultancy/training/.

  3. 3.

    Funded under the EC Leonardo Da Vinci programme LLP/LV/TOI/2009/IRL-512.

  4. 4.

    EXCROSS was a Supporting Action funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013). Grant Agreement n° TCS1-GA-2011-284895.

  5. 5.

    SEAHORSE is a research project funded by the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SST-2013-RTD-1). Grant Agreement n° SCP-GA-2013-605639.

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Correspondence to Paul M. Liston .

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Liston, P.M. et al. (2017). Transferring Learning Across Safety-Critical Industries. In: MacLachlan, M. (eds) Maritime Psychology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45430-6_3

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