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Displacement and Local Extinction of Native and Endemic Species

Part of the Invading Nature - Springer Series in Invasion Ecology book series (INNA,volume 12)

Abstract

The observational evidence on non-native plants, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks earthworms, and insects as drivers of population declines or extinctions of native taxa suggests that non-native predators are far more likely to cause the extinction of native species than non-native competitors. Notable examples of such taxa include non-native vertebrates and mollusks as mainly predators and plants and insects as mainly competitors. The most vulnerable species are insular endemics, presumably because of the lack of coevolution between introduced predator and native prey. Island-like situations contribute to severe impacts because the affected native taxa have nowhere to escape. The presence of dormant stages in plants makes it possible to escape unfavourable conditions over time and might contribute to the lack of clear evidence of native plant species driven to extinction by plant invaders. Overall, robust evidence has accumulated during the past few decades that non-native species are drivers of local and global extinctions of threatened, often endemic, native species.

Keywords

  • Competition
  • Disease
  • Endemic species
  • Invasion debt
  • Island
  • Species extinction
  • Population decline
  • Predation
  • Vulnerable species

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Acknowledgments

P.P. was supported by long-term research development project RVO 67985939, project no. 14-36079G (Centre of Excellence PLADIAS) from Czech Science Foundation and Praemium Academiae award from The Czech Academy of Sciences. Additional financial support was provided by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (project CGL2013-43822-R) and the European Commission (COST Action Alien Challenge TD1209).

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Pyšek, P., Blackburn, T.M., García-Berthou, E., Perglová, I., Rabitsch, W. (2017). Displacement and Local Extinction of Native and Endemic Species. In: Vilà, M., Hulme, P. (eds) Impact of Biological Invasions on Ecosystem Services. Invading Nature - Springer Series in Invasion Ecology, vol 12. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45121-3_10

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