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Is Dreaming Related to Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation?

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Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Consolidation

Abstract

As testing the functions of dreams directly is not possible, empirical dream research has focused on three areas providing indirect support for a relationship between dreaming and sleep-dependent memory consolidation: (1) Correlation between the activity of the sleeping brain and dreaming, (2) Effects of waking-life on dream content (continuity hypothesis), and (3) Effects of dreams on subsequent daytime behavior and performance. Findings indicate that dream content might be related to reactivation processes, with dream content reflecting learning in waking life, and a dream training effect on waking performance provided some support for the claim that dreaming is influenced by brain processes related to sleep dependent memory consolidation. The research in this area is, however, just at its beginning.

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Schredl, M. (2017). Is Dreaming Related to Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation?. In: Axmacher, N., Rasch, B. (eds) Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Consolidation. Studies in Neuroscience, Psychology and Behavioral Economics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-45066-7_11

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