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Cybercrime: Definition, Typology, and Criminalization

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Cybercrime, Organized Crime, and Societal Responses

Abstract

This chapter addresses the theme of cybercrime, providing an overall review of the basic definition, legal principles, and responses to this growing criminal justice reality. It systematically addresses the definition of cybercrime, the legal interests protected by Information and Communication Technology and Cyber Crime law. It addresses in depth the extent of criminalization, especially preparation and possession. It does focus on the issue of the challenges and limits of criminal legislation. It concludes with an analysis of the legal demands advanced by the internationalization of cyber crime, a typical characteristic of this type of crime and ends examining projected trends for the future. The chapter is documented carefully and exhaustively.

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Viano, E.C. (2017). Cybercrime: Definition, Typology, and Criminalization. In: Viano, E. (eds) Cybercrime, Organized Crime, and Societal Responses. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-44501-4_1

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