The Role of ROS and Redox Signaling During the Initial Cellular Response to Abiotic Stress

Chapter

Abstract

When confronted with abiotic stress, plants actively adjust their metabolism and development. Imbalances in cellular processes are often accompanied by a change in reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. Uncontrolled accumulation of ROS will result in oxidative damage of plant tissues eventually resulting in cell death. In the last decades, it has become clear that plants exposed to abiotic stress show specific and highly dynamic signaling responses, in which ROS function as genuine signaling molecules. Here, we specifically provide an overview of recent advances and current understanding of the role of ROS signaling during the initial phase of abiotic stress. Although different molecular pathways are involved in the detection of specific forms of abiotic stress, they all share a common basic plan. This includes the production of an oxidative burst, kinase-mediated signal transduction and the activation of dormant transcription factors to initiate transcriptional reprogramming within seconds or minutes of stress detection. In this chapter, the contribution of ROS signaling in the regulation of plant adaptation during high-light, temperature, salt and low-oxygen stress will be addressed.

Keywords

Abiotic stress ROS signal NADPH oxidase Transcriptional regulation Kinase cascade Retrograde signaling 

Abbreviations

Ca2+

Calcium ion

EX

Executer

H2O2

Hydrogen peroxide

·OH

Hydroxyl radicals

mtETC

Mitochondrial electron transport chain

MAPK

Mitogen-activated protein kinase

PRX

Peroxiredoxin

RBOH

Respiratory burst oxidase

ROS

Reactive oxygen species

1O2

Singlet oxygen

SOD

Superoxide dismutase

O2·−

Superoxide

SAA

Systemic acquired acclimation

tAPX

Thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Biology IRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany

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