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Defining New Pathways for Ecosystem-Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Adaptation in the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Agenda

  • Marisol Estrella
  • Fabrice G. RenaudEmail author
  • Karen Sudmeier-Rieux
  • Udo Nehren
Chapter
  • 1.3k Downloads
Part of the Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research book series (NTHR, volume 42)

Abstract

This chapter seeks to articulate future directions in the field of Eco-DRR/CCA, in the context of the new post-2015 sustainable development agenda. It synthesises the experiences featured in this book and highlights the key challenges and opportunities in advancing Eco-DRR/CCA approaches. Four main themes are discussed: demonstrating the economic evidence of Eco-DRR/CCA; decision-making tools for Eco-DRR/CCA; innovative institutional arrangements and policies for mainstreaming Eco-DRR/CCA; and research gaps. The major global policy agreements in 2015 are examined for their relevance in promoting Eco-DRR/CCA implementation in countries. Finally, the authors reflect on a new agenda for Eco-DRR/CCA and outline some of the key elements required to significantly advance and scale-up Eco-DRR/CCA implementation globally.

Keywords

Ecosystem Service Geographic Information System Disaster Risk Climate Change Adaptation United Nations Environment Programme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marisol Estrella
    • 1
  • Fabrice G. Renaud
    • 2
    Email author
  • Karen Sudmeier-Rieux
    • 3
  • Udo Nehren
    • 4
  1. 1.Post-Conflict and Disaster Management BranchUnited Nations Environment ProgrammeGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS)BonnGermany
  3. 3.Commission on Ecosystem Management International Union for Conservation of NatureGlandSwitzerland
  4. 4.Institute for Technology and Resources Management in the Tropics and Subtropics (ITT)TH Köln, University of Applied SciencesKölnGermany

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