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Disinterest in Play in Infancy: Problems in the Regulation of Attention and Play

  • Mechthild PapoušekEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The regulation of play and attention is of twofold significance in the treatment of early childhood regulatory disorders: both as an important factor in the development of infant self-regulation and resilience and as a source of positive relational experiences. Two-thirds of infants presenting at specialist outpatient clinics for early childhood regulatory disorders exhibit atypical deficits in both solitary and joint play associated with disinterest in play, dysphoric mood, problems with attention, and motor restlessness. The clinical syndrome of and conditions conducive to this disorder, as well as its play-centered diagnostic assessment and play therapy-based interventions are presented in a practice-oriented manner using case studies, clinical studies, and video-supported observations. The chapter concludes with a discussion of frequently asked questions relating to possible developmental psychopathological links between early disinterest in play and ADHD.

Keywords

Regulation of attention Tasks in play Joint play Disinterest in play Play-centered interventions 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Social Pediatrics and Youth MedicineUniversity of MunichRosenheimGermany

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