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Women’s Power to Give: Their Central Role in Northern Plains First Nations

  • JoAllyn Archambault
  • Alice Beck KehoeEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 17)

Abstract

JoAllyn Archambault and Alice Beck Kehoe explain the essential role of women in the most important Blackfoot ceremony, that of the Sun Dance (okan). Blackfoot tradition requires that a woman vows to lead it. This crucial role was not recorded by Western ethnographers who disregarded the participation of women. Archambault and Kehoe detail the elements of this ceremony illustrating the complementary and absolutely necessary activities of both women and men.

Keywords

Blackfoot First Nations Sun Dance Women’s central role Gift Priestess Sacred bundles Women’s power to reproduce Giveaway Complementary spheres Intermediary Holiness 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologySmithsonian InstitutionWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Marquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA

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