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Contributing to Continuity: Women and Sacrifice in Ancient Israel

  • Carol L. MeyersEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 17)

Abstract

In this first chapter Carol Meyers examines carefully the archaeological and textual evidence, as well as ethnographic data, for women’s participation in ancient Israel’s rituals. She explores the different religious activities, e.g., temple sacrifices, funerary rituals, and household offerings, that ensured the sustenance, prosperity, and continuity of the Israelites. In so doing Meyers presents new insights into women’s roles in this period.

Keywords

Bloody and unbloody offerings Cultic functionaries Intercessory roles Near Eastern context Reproductive rituals Sacrifice Temple Women Women’s religious activities Mary Douglas 

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Religious StudiesDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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