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Creating a More Inclusive Society: Social-Developmental Research on Intergroup Relations in Childhood and Adolescence

  • João. H. C. AntónioEmail author
  • Rita Correia
  • Allard R. Feddes
  • Rita Morais
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter gives a comprehensive and broad overview on how intergroup relations develop in childhood. The review touches several important aspects such as acculturation goals of minorities and their meta-perceptions of the majorities’ acculturation preferences, the importance of social comparisons as well as the way how the broader social context, particularly more inclusive superordinate categories, is related to status asymmetries between children from different ethnic background. The importance to take into account social context factors in the understanding of intergroup relations is one of the most important take home messages from this chapter. For instance, effects of as well as preferences for acculturation strategies such as assimilation or integration depend on minorities’ perceptions of what the majority expects them to be or do. It was the challenge to deal with results of research conducted in Portugal that contradicted previous findings in Anglo-Saxon countries that inspired and required the advancement in theorizing towards more contextual models.

Keywords

Intergroup meta-perceptions Prejudice development Acculturation Status positions Intergroup relations 

Notes

Acknowledgments

All authors provided an equal contribution to this chapter. Parts of the research presented in this chapter were funded by grants of the Portuguese Science Foundation awarded to Maria Benedicta Monteiro (PTDC/PSI/71271/2006), João H. C. António (SFRH/BD/27692/2006), Rita Correia (SFRH/BD/21958/2005) and Rita Morais (SFRH/BD/31651/2006). We thank Mariline Justo, Susana Barroso, and Marisa Santos for their research assistance. We thank Maria Benedicta Monteiro for the discussion, the advice, the work, the fun and for her friendship throughout these years.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • João. H. C. António
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rita Correia
    • 1
  • Allard R. Feddes
    • 2
  • Rita Morais
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), CIS-IULLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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