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Space Drives and Anti-gravity

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Abstract

Pseudoscientists and science fiction authors share a vested interest in breaking the laws of physics—whether it is Newton’s law of gravity, Einstein’s speed-of-light limitation, the conservation of momentum or the laws of thermodynamics. However, the motives in the two cases are quite different. SF writers want to create interesting stories; pseudoscientists want to take a stand against authority. To the latter the ultimate goal may be anti-gravity, free energy or perpetual motion; to the former it is more likely to be an antimatter-powered faster-than-light warp drive. This chapter compares and contrasts the two perspectives.

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May, A. (2017). Space Drives and Anti-gravity. In: Pseudoscience and Science Fiction. Science and Fiction. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-42605-1_6

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