Advertisement

High-Tech Paranoia

  • Andrew May
Chapter
  • 1.1k Downloads
Part of the Science and Fiction book series (SCIFICT)

Abstract

Richard Shaver caused a stir in the science fiction world of the 1940s with a series of stories that blurred the boundaries between fiction, pseudoscience and paranoia. The Shaver Mystery, as it became known, told of an ancient race of degenerate humans living in underground caves, and controlling world affairs through disruptive rays and other advanced technology. Although Shaver is largely forgotten today, his legacy lives on both in the world of conspiracy theories—many of which echo his themes of secret masters and mind control—and in the paranoid fiction of writers like Philip K. Dick.

Keywords

Science Fiction Conspiracy Theorist World Affair Royal Family Surface World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Ron Goulart, Cheap Thrills (Hermes Press, Pennsylvania, 2007), p. 141Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruce Lanier Wright, “From Hero to Dero”, Fortean Times, October 1999, pp. 36-41Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. Sprague de Camp, Lost Continents (Dover, New York, 1970), pp. 47, 51Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fred Nadis, The Man from Mars (Penguin, New York, 2014), p. 62Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    L. Sprague de Camp, Lost Continents (Dover, New York, 1970), p. 71Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fred Nadis, The Man from Mars (Penguin, New York, 2014), pp 12-13Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ray Palmer, in Amazing Stories, June 1947, p. 177Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mike Dash, Borderlands (Arrow Books, London, 1998), p. 229Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ray Palmer, in Amazing Stories, February 1946, p. 3Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    David Hatcher Childress, Lost Continents & the Hollow Earth, Adventures Unlimited, 1999, p. vGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mark Pilkington, “The Air Loom”, in Fortean Times, May 2003, pp. 40-42Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Richard S. Shaver, “I Remember Lemuria”, in Amazing Stories, March 1945, pp. 12-70Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ray Palmer, in Amazing Stories, August 1946, p. 6Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Fred Nadis, The Man from Mars (Penguin, New York, 2014), p. 88Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ray Palmer, in Amazing Stories, July 1946, p. 6Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Fred Nadis, The Man from Mars (Penguin, New York, 2014), p. 137Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    David Hatcher Childress, Lost Continents & the Hollow Earth, Adventures Unlimited, 1999, p. 229Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    David Hatcher Childress, Lost Continents & the Hollow Earth, Adventures Unlimited, 1999, p. viGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Judge Anderson: The Psi Files, Volume 2 (Rebellion, Oxford, 2012), pp. 3-63Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Ron Goulart, Hello, Lemuria, Hello (DAW Books, NY, 1979), pp. 17-18Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Richard Leon, “The Tin Foil Hat Machine”, in Fortean Times, November 2013, pp. 38-43Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ray Nelson, “Eight O’Clock in the Morning”, in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, November 1963, pp. 74-78Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    John Carpenter (dir.), They Live, Universal Pictures, 1988Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Philip K. Dick, The Golden Man (Magnum Books, London, 1981), p. 333Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Lawrence Sutin, Divine Invasions (Harper Collins, London, 1991), p. 128Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Stuart Holroyd, The Elements of Gnosticism (Element Books, Dorset, 1994)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Philip K. Dick, Eye in the Sky (Arrow Books, London, 1979), p. 114Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Philip K. Dick, The Penultimate Truth (Triad Panther, St Albans, 1978), pp. 71-72Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Lawrence Sutin, Divine Invasions (Harper Collins, London, 1991), p. 179Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Nick Redfern, Science Fiction Secrets (Anomalist Books, San Antonio, 2009), pp. 162-3Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Lawrence Sutin, Divine Invasions (Harper Collins, London, 1991), p. 213Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Joe McNally, “Vast Active Living Intelligence System”, in Fortean Times, August 2002, p. 46Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Philip K. Dick, VALIS (Grafton, London, 1992), p. 171Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Mark Pilkington, “There Is No Way Out of the Maze”, in Fortean Times, September 2002, pp. 24-25Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Paul Rydeen, “The Black Knight from Space”, in Wake Up Down There! (Adventures Unlimited Press, Illinois, 2000), p. 317Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    “The Truth About the Black Knight Satellite Mystery”, Armagh Planetarium, http://www.armaghplanet.com/blog/the-truth-about-the-black-knight-satellite-mystery.html
  37. 37.
    Philip K. Dick, “The Father-Thing”, in Paycheck (Gollancz, London, 2003), pp. 141-155Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Philip K. Dick, “Colony”, in A Handful of Darkness (Panther, St Albans, 1980), pp. 7-25Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Bob Rickard, “A Fortean Guide to The X-Files Season Two”, in Fortean Times, May 1996, 30-31Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Arthur C. Clarke, Astounding Days (Gollancz, London, 1990), p. 145Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    John W. Campbell, “Who Goes There?” in The Future in Question (Fawcett Crest, New York, 1980), pp. 239-298Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Jamie King, Conspiracy Theories (Summersdale Publishers, West Sussex, 2015), p. 53Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Jamie King, Conspiracy Theories (Summersdale Publishers, West Sussex, 2015), p. 237Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Robert E. Howard, The Shadow Kingdom (Panther, St Albans, 1976), p. 61Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew May
    • 1
  1. 1.CrewkerneUK

Personalised recommendations