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Philanthropic Foundations and the International Climate Regime

  • Edouard Morena
Chapter
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Abstract

Chapter 2 looks at the origins of philanthropic involvement in the climate debate. It shows how liberal US foundations have historically dominated the field of climate philanthropy. In the 1980s and 1990s, through their grantmaking and convening activities, they helped to popularize the climate question in the USA and to lay the basis for the international climate regime. In the early years, foundation involvement in the climate debate was facilitated by the fact that it was less about policy action than about crafting an international framework for policy action (UNFCCC, IPCC). Once the framework was in place, foundations were left with the (daunting) task of getting countries—and in particular the USA—to commit to ambitious and binding action.

Keywords

Liberal environmentalism Liberal philanthropy Climate regime UNFCCC 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edouard Morena
    • 1
  1. 1.ULIP and CNRS-LADYSSParisFrance

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