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Engaging and Effective Staff Training to Improve Patient Safety and Satisfaction

  • Gregg AlexanderEmail author
  • Patrick Baker
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 482)

Abstract

Improving patient safety and increasing patient satisfaction are top priority concerns for healthcare institutions. Alarm fatigue is also a key and very problematic issue. Developing programs to address these problems often involves making system-wide cultural changes, but changing institutional culture can be challenging. Use of animation and storytelling to inspire emotional “buy in” from staff, combined with an efficient and engaging multimedia training program, can allow for rapid and cost-effective cultural change. A “culture of safety” is established yielding improvements in patient safety and satisfaction while decreasing alarm fatigue for clinical staff.

Keywords

Staff training Patient safety Patient satisfaction Animation Alarm fatigue Patient call lights Culture change 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Health Nuts MediaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.University of Cincinnati Health West ChesterCincinnatiUSA

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