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Stress Intensity Factors Through Crack Opening Displacements in the XFEM

  • Markus SchätzerEmail author
  • Thomas-Peter Fries
Chapter
Part of the SEMA SIMAI Springer Series book series (SEMA SIMAI, volume 12)

Abstract

The computation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) for two- and three-dimensional cracks based on crack opening displacements (CODs) is presented in linear elastic fracture mechanics. For the evaluation, two different states are involved. An approximated state represents the computed displacements in the solid, which is obtained by an extended finite element method (XFEM) simulation based on a hybrid explicit-implicit crack description. On the other hand, a reference state is defined which represents the expected openings for a pure mode I, II and III. This reference state is aligned with the (curved) crack surface and extracted from the level-set functions, no matter whether the crack is planar or not. Furthermore, as only displacements are fitted, no additional considerations for pressurized crack surfaces are required. The proposed method offers an intuitive, robust and computationally cheap technique for the computation of SIFs where two- and three-dimensional crack configurations are treated in the same manner.

Keywords

Stress Intensity Factor Crack Surface Crack Front Crack Opening Displacement Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Structural AnalysisGraz University of TechnologyGrazAustria

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