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Economic Aspects of Genetic Resources in Addressing Agricultural Productivity in the Context of Climate Change

  • Charles NhemachenaEmail author
  • Greenwell Matchaya
  • Sibusiso Nhlengethwa
  • Charity R. Nhemachena
Chapter

Abstract

The main objective of this paper is to discuss the economic aspects of genetic resources in addressing agricultural productivity in the context of climate change and variability in Africa. The paper synthesizes the published literature related to this topic, which has not been well integrated, especially with respect to economic improvements and the use of genetic resources in Africa. The focus is to understand the nexus between climate change, genetic resources, and agricultural productivity; the economic aspects involved in the conservation and improvement of genetic resources at farm-level use; and the adoption of these technologies to address agricultural productivity. The results show that climate change affects both genetic resources and agricultural productivity. The interaction of climate change and other stressors exacerbates the vulnerability of agricultural production systems and genetic resources. The conservation and improvement of genetic resources should address the urgent need to increase investments in conservation and the development of future adapted technologies. At the farm level, the focus should be on developing distribution and dissemination systems, including raising awareness and educating farmers on the role of genetic resource technologies in addressing agricultural productivity under climate change. Furthermore, it is critical to ensure that farmers have the means to purchase the improved genetic resource technologies to be able to use and adopt them. Efforts to conserve, improve, and promote the use of genetic resource technologies in addressing agricultural productivity should integrate the distribution, accessibility, and use of the improved technologies at the farm level and be integrated in broader adaptation and development efforts.

Keywords

Economic aspects Genetic resources Agricultural productivity Climate change 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles Nhemachena
    • 1
    Email author
  • Greenwell Matchaya
    • 1
  • Sibusiso Nhlengethwa
    • 1
  • Charity R. Nhemachena
    • 2
  1. 1.International Water Management InstitutePretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural DevelopmentUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa

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