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Introduction to the Volume

  • Richard JessorEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advancing Responsible Adolescent Development book series (ARAD)

Abstract

The development of Problem Behavior Theory over more than half a century, from its inception in the late 1950s to its current formulation, is sketched out in this introductory chapter. Three major, sequential, research projects, each of which resulted in influential books, are briefly described: The Tri-Ethnic Community Study; The Socialization of Problem Behavior in Youth Study; and The Young Adult Follow-Up Study. The challenging quest to achieve an interdisciplinary, psychosocial theory relevant to adolescent behavior and development, one that incorporated concepts about both person and social context, is elaborated. Contributions of Problem Behavior Theory-guided inquiry over the years are noted, e.g., the syndrome organization of adolescent and young adult problem behavior; the key role of problem behavior in the transition out of adolescence; the continuity between the adolescent and young adult life stages; and the perspective that much of adolescent problem behavior involvement is part of normal development. The more recent extension of Problem Behavior Theory into new domains, e.g., adolescent health, contexts of adversity and limited opportunity, and pro-social behavior, as well as its applications cross-nationally, are also described.

Keywords

Problem Behavior Theory Problem behavior syndrome Transition proneness Tri-ethnic study Pro-social behavior Adolescent health Psycho-social development 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of Colorado at BoulderBoulderUSA

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