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Theorising Emerging Powers in Africa within the Western-Led System of Accumulation

Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Justin van der Merwe presents the usefulness of understanding the global political economy as a series of interconnected systems of accumulation. The analysis is centred and builds on the notion of a ‘complex’, which is often said to embody a system or theory of accumulation. The chapter develops a systemic understanding of global accumulation centred on what may be called the ‘government-business-media complex’. Synthesising Harvey and Gramsci, Van der Merwe theorises that complexes, including state, capital and information and knowledge systems, operate through hegemonic and transactional activities to facilitate capital accumulation across space and time. After an assessment of the global structure, the role of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) and other emerging powers within this system and particularly their involvement in Africa, is assessed.

Keywords

  • Capital Accumulation
  • Power Network
  • Dominant State
  • African National Congress
  • Intermediary Level

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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van der Merwe, J. (2016). Theorising Emerging Powers in Africa within the Western-Led System of Accumulation. In: van der Merwe, J., Taylor, I., Arkhangelskaya, A. (eds) Emerging Powers in Africa. International Political Economy Series. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40736-4_2

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