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Extending Empirical Analysis of Usability and Playability to Multimodal Computer Games

  • David NovickEmail author
  • Laura M. Rodriguez
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9746)

Abstract

The published research examining usability and playability of games is largely theoretical. A prior empirical study of a game with an embodied conversational agent found that most frustration episodes could be understood in terms of both usability and playability, but this study was based on a game in which the interaction by both player and agent were limited to verbal communication. To explore whether these results would hold for a game in which the player and agent communicated with both speech and gesture, we conducted an empirical formative user-experience evaluation of a multimodal game. Our findings strongly confirmed that frustration episodes can be understood as issues of both usability and playability. However, the relative frequencies of the categories of usability and playability issues differed between the speech-only and the speech-and-gesture games. Much of this difference likely arose because higher levels of engagement and rapport between player and agent in the speech-and-gesture game led to the players having greater, and in many cases unfulfilled, expectations for the capabilities of the agent.

Keywords

Embodied conversational agent User experience Playability Usability Gesture Engagement Rapport 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge with gratitude the team, in addition to the authors, that developed Survival on Jungle Island: Ivan Gris, Adriana Camacho, Diego Rivera, Mario Gutierrez, Alex Rayon, Joel Quintana, Anuar Jauregui, Timothy Gonzales, Alfonso Peralta, Victoria Bravo, Jacqueline Brixey, Yahaira Reyes, Paola Gallardo, Chelsey Jurado, Guillaume Adoneth, David Manuel, Brynne Blaugrund, and Nick Farber.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceThe University of Texas at El PasoEl PasoUSA

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