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Professional: A Sexologist Who Overstepped the Mark—How to Handle the Therapeutic Relationship in Psychosocial Care

  • Jan C. Wouda
  • Harry B. M. van de Wiel
  • K. Marieke Paarlberg
Chapter

Abstract

For therapists, who work according to the biopsychosocial model (BPS model), conversations with the patient are their main tool used for diagnostics and interventions. Other forms of communication—such as questionnaires, written information, and websites—can be used as supplementary material. To ensure that his or her conversations with a patient are effective and efficient, the therapist must build up a good relationship with that patient. This chapter is about the characteristics of the care relationship generated by the biopsychosocial model. We will be focusing mainly on the characteristics of the therapeutic relationship. The care relationship as the basis for a diagnostic conversation will be discussed only in passing.

Keywords

Professional Therapeutic relationship Cross-boundary behavior CanMEDS competencies Maintaining boundaries Professional behavior Empathy Integrity Respect Conscientiousness 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This chapter is an adaptation of Wouda JC, Van de Wiel HBM, Gijs L. The sexological care relationship (De seksuologische hulpverleningsrelatie). In: Gijs L, Gianoten W, Vanwesenbeeck I, Weijenborg Ph (editors). Seksuologie (2nd edition). Houten, The Netherlands: Bohn Stafleu Van Loghum 2009; Chapter 13:311–31.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan C. Wouda
    • 1
  • Harry B. M. van de Wiel
    • 2
  • K. Marieke Paarlberg
    • 3
  1. 1.Ahmas FoundationGroningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Wenckebach InstituteUniversity of Groningen, University Medical Centre GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyGelre Hospitals, Apeldoorn LocationApeldoornThe Netherlands

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