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Active-Wheel Mouse for Human-Computer Interface

Slippage-Perception Characteristics on Fingerpad
  • Yoshihiko NomuraEmail author
  • Satoshi Oike
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9738)

Abstract

This paper presents an active wheel mouse that can present slippages to the fingertip skin. The active wheel mouse is a mouse device that embeds a wheel actively rotating in any directions, with any speeds and duration times. Here, raised-dots of 4.5 and 10.5 mm intervals were especially introduced to the peripheral surface of the wheel. As a result of a pilot study by psychophysical experiments, it was suggested that, from the viewpoint of the perceived lengths, the active wheel mouse was effective enough to provide the slippage information and that is superior to the flat surface without raised dots, i.e., non-bumpy surface.

Keywords

Active-wheel mouse Man-machine interface Motion Slippage perception Fingerpad Raised dot 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by KAKENHI (Grant-in-Aid for scientific research (B) 19H02929 from JSPS).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mie UniversityTsuJapan

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