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Measurement of Lens Focus Adjustment While Wearing a See-Through Head-Mounted Display

  • Ryota Kimura
  • Kohei Iwata
  • Takahiro Totani
  • Toshiaki Miyao
  • Takehito Kojima
  • Hiroki Takada
  • Hiromu Ishio
  • Chizue Uneme
  • Masaru MiyaoEmail author
  • Masumi Takada
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9738)

Abstract

In recent years, many visual devices have been produced for consumers. The development of see-through smart glasses has attracted much attention. These glasses overlap virtually images by using Augmented Reality (AR) technology. Epson released the BT-2000 see-through smart glasses, which change distance of display by changing convergence. It is not confirmed that changing distance of display allow to change distance of lends accommodation. In this experiment, we measured lens accommodation of subjects viewing images displayed on see-through smart glasses. The results found that lens accommodation moved with the image position for over one hundred people. Therefore, our study verified that correct reaction occurred visual physiologically.

Keywords

See-through Smart glasses Lens accommodation AR 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryota Kimura
    • 1
  • Kohei Iwata
    • 1
  • Takahiro Totani
    • 2
  • Toshiaki Miyao
    • 2
  • Takehito Kojima
    • 1
  • Hiroki Takada
    • 3
  • Hiromu Ishio
    • 4
  • Chizue Uneme
    • 1
  • Masaru Miyao
    • 1
    Email author
  • Masumi Takada
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Information Engineering, Graduate School of Information ScienceNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Seiko Epson CorporationAzuminoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Human and Artificial Intelligent Systems, Graduate School of EngineeringUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Urban ManagementFukuyama City UniversityFukuyamaJapan
  5. 5.Chubu Gakuin UniversitySekiJapan

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