Treatments in Patients with Cancer and Cardiac Diseases

  • Iris Parrini
  • Chiara Lestuzzi
  • Cezar Iliescu
  • Brigida Stanzione
Chapter

Abstract

The incidence and the prevalence of both cardiovascular and the neoplastic diseases are increasing, as are the therapeutic possibilities and survival. Thus, identifying the best cardiovascular care in a patient ready to start an antineoplastic treatment is becoming a rather common problem.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iris Parrini
    • 1
  • Chiara Lestuzzi
    • 2
  • Cezar Iliescu
    • 3
  • Brigida Stanzione
    • 4
  1. 1.Cardiology DepartmentHospital MaurizianoTurinItaly
  2. 2.Cardiology UnitIRCCS CRO-National Cancer InstituteAviano (PN)Italy
  3. 3.Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiology DepartmentMD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Medical OncologyIRCCS-CRO, National Cancer InstituteAviano (PN)Italy

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