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Reasoning Beyond the Mental World

Part of the Human–Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS)

Abstract

Having considered autistic reasoning about the mental world, we now focus on other reasoning domains: probabilistic and counterfactual, adjustment of actions, and its nonmonotonic features. Default reasoning of children with autism handling conflicting rules is also explored.

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Galitsky, B. (2016). Reasoning Beyond the Mental World. In: Computational Autism. Human–Computer Interaction Series. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39972-0_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39972-0_6

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-39971-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-39972-0

  • eBook Packages: Computer ScienceComputer Science (R0)

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