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Introduction: Strategic Culture and Participation in International Military Operations

  • Malena Britz
Chapter
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Part of the New Security Challenges book series (NSECH)

Abstract

This book uses the concept of strategic culture to analyse French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish, and British participation in four different international military operations. We study participation and non-participation in Operation Enduring Freedom/ISAF in Afghanistan, Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq, EU NAVFOR Atalanta outside Somalia, and Operation Unified Protector in Libya, including how decisions were justified. The first chapter of the book specifies our definition of strategic culture as the normative and regulative framework that enables certain decisions but at the same time restrains other decisions with regard to participation in international military operations. It also discusses how this conceptualisation of strategic culture is related to the previous literature of strategic culture and how we have operationalised the concept.

Keywords

Armed Force Military Operation International Operation Normative Framework Operation Iraqi Freedom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

As well as the authors of the different chapters who all have discussed and commented on previous drafts of this chapter, Jacob Westberg, Charlotte Wagnsson, Tomas Olsson, Jan Ångström, and an anonymous reviewer have all given valuable input to previous drafts of the text.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malena Britz
    • 1
  1. 1.StockholmSweden

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