Social-Psychological Dimensions of International Conflict (2007)

Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 13)

Abstract

Social-psychological concepts and findings have entered the mainstream of theory and research in international relations. Explorations of the social-psychological dimensions of international politics go back at least to the early 1930s.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s)  2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Weatherhead Center for International AffairsHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.School of International Service, International Peace and Conflict ResolutionAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA

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