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When Humor Goes Missing

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Humor in Infants

Part of the book series: SpringerBriefs in Psychology ((BRIEFSCD))

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Abstract

What are we to make of it when humor is missing, either in the environment or in the infant herself? Humorlessness may reveal a typical temperamental characteristic, an atypical developmental trajectory like that of the autism spectrum, or an environmental aberration like severe neglect.

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Mireault, G.C., Reddy, V. (2016). When Humor Goes Missing. In: Humor in Infants. SpringerBriefs in Psychology(). Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-38963-9_5

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