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Humor and Its Socio-Emotional Emergence

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Humor in Infants

Part of the book series: SpringerBriefs in Psychology ((BRIEFSCD))

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Abstract

Humor rises up between and among others. Caregivers’ earliest attempts to amuse infants involve wildly absurd, novel behavior paired with emotional cues that convey joy and safety. Infants’ earliest attempts to create humor follow suit. Before the end of the first year, infants tease and tell non-verbal “jokes”, revealing what they know about the social rules of engagement and the minds of those whom they amuse.

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Mireault, G.C., Reddy, V. (2016). Humor and Its Socio-Emotional Emergence. In: Humor in Infants. SpringerBriefs in Psychology(). Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-38963-9_4

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