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Application of the NaWaTech Safety and O&M Planning Approach Re-Use Oriented Wastewater Treatment Lines at the Ordnance Factory Ambajhari, Nagpur, India

  • Sandra Nicolics
  • Diana Hewitt
  • Girish R. Pophali
  • Fabio Masi
  • Dayanand Panse
  • Pawan K. Labhasetwar
  • Katie Meinhold
  • Günter LangergraberEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Not only due to a lack of infrastructure such as treatment plants, but also because the majority of existing treatment plants are showing poor or very poor operating conditions and fail to meet their performance targets, India faces increasing water shortage and degradation of fresh water resources. The paper gives an overview on the methodology of a safety and O&M (operation and maintenance) planning approach developed and implemented for supporting sustainable long-term operation of wastewater treatment systems. The implementation of the methodology is shown for the pilot installation at Ordnance Factory Ambajhari, Nagpur, India. At this site, two treatment lines have been installed: Line 1 is designed for 100 m3/day and comprises anaerobic pre-treatment, a vertical upflow constructed wetland, followed by a disinfection step, line 2 designed for 8 m3/day is a 2-stage French Reed Bed system. The effluent of the French Reed Bed system is used for irrigation of a Short Rotation Plantation. The safety and O&M planning approach was used to identify critical O&M tasks, develop site-specific trainings of operators as well as a basis to develop the O&M manual and materials for operators (such as check-lists, etc.).

Keywords

Constructed wetlands French Reed Bed Sanitation safety plan 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work is carried out within the project NaWaTech (Natural Water Systems and Treatment Technologies to cope with Water Shortages in Urbanised Areas in India, http://nawatech.net/, duration: 1.7.2012 – 31.12.2015). NaWaTech is funded within the EU 7th Framework Programme (Contract # 308336) and by the Department of Science and Technology (DST), Government of India (DST Sanction Order # DST/IMRCD/NaWaTech/2012/(G)). The authors are grateful for the support.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Nicolics
    • 1
  • Diana Hewitt
    • 1
  • Girish R. Pophali
    • 2
  • Fabio Masi
    • 3
  • Dayanand Panse
    • 4
  • Pawan K. Labhasetwar
    • 2
  • Katie Meinhold
    • 5
  • Günter Langergraber
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute of Sanitary Engineering and Water Pollution ControlUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU University)ViennaAustria
  2. 2.CSIR – National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI)NagpurIndia
  3. 3.IRIDRA S.r.l.FlorenceItaly
  4. 4.Ecosan Service FoundationPuneIndia
  5. 5.ttz BremerhavenBremerhavenGermany

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