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A Review of Possible Emerging Theoretical Debates and New Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Cooperative Movement in Africa

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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Geography book series (BRIEFSGEOGRAPHY)

Abstract

The remarkable resilience displayed by the cooperative sector in international experience is also manifested in the African continent where cooperatives can be said to have traversed a particularly difficult trajectory. Despite the commonly acknowledged fact that most post-colonial African governments attempted to use cooperatives as tools of development in their quest to attain nation-building goals and did not allow them to become fully autonomous member-owned and controlled businesses, there is evidence of a resurgence of cooperatives in the continent. Several studies have examined conditions under which cooperatives thrive or fail. These studies have brought to the fore interesting insights on a number of critical factors; key amongst them is the role of social capital in the creation of a facilitative environment conducive to the growth of cooperatives. This chapter will interrogate this literature with a view to understanding not only the key theoretical debates but also the interdisciplinary perspectives that are shaping the intellectual discourse accompanying the resurgence of the cooperative movement in Africa.

Keywords

Cooperative Interdisciplinary perspectives resilience Resurgence Social capital 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Economic History and Development Studies, School of Social SciencesUniversity of KwaZulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa

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