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Contractarian Foundations of Order Ethics

  • Christoph LuetgeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This article discusses two major approaches to business ethics which rest on the foundation of social contract theory: The contractualist position of Integrative Social Contract Theory (ISCT) and the contractarian position of Order Ethics. Both are summarized and analysed critically. It turns out that Order Ethics might remedy some defects of ISCT.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Business Ethic Ethical Norm Social Contract Theory Integrative Social Contract Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chair of Business EthicsTechnical University of MunichMunichGermany

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