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Cyber Security Challenges: The Israeli Water Sector Example

Part of the Protecting Critical Infrastructure book series (PCIN,volume 3)

Abstract

Critical infrastructure protection spans an increasing number of publicly and privately owned nondefense entities. As cyberspace continued to expand, securing society requires a comprehensive approach to include business sector cooperation with all levels of government. More attention must be devoted to activities and facilities not only on the national but also on the municipal level. This will require nontraditional governance approaches to complement the usual top–down national regulation. We discuss recent cyber security policy developments in Israel, and move on to discuss future cyber security challenges using water supply as an example. Hopefully the approaches discussed in this paper will provide useful information for other developed countries.

Keywords

  • Municipal Level
  • Critical Infrastructure
  • Million Cubic Meter
  • Israeli Defense Force
  • Industrial Control System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 10.1

Notes

  1. 1.

    Israelis were targeted by terrorists on the streets, cafes, and buses in a cycle of violence that claimed the lives of 319 Israeli soldiers and 745 civilians, and left 2430 soldiers and 5032 civilians wounded.

  2. 2.

    The Stephen and Nancy Grand Water Research Institute at the Technion and its founder Prof. Uri Shamir are the focal point of water related research and policy in Israel.

  3. 3.

    ILITA consists of three regulators: the database register, responsible for oversight and enforcement of data protection guidelines; the electronic signature register, and credit score service providers register.

  4. 4.

    https://cert.gov.il/.

Abbreviations

BOT:

Build–operate–transfer

BYOD:

Bring your own device

CIP:

Critical infrastructure protection

CoTS:

Commercial off-the-shelf

DDR&D:

(Maf’at מפא”ת) Ministry of Defense Directorate for Research & Development

DOD:

Department of Defense

ICS:

Industrial control system

IDF (Tzahal צה”ל):

Israel Defence Forces

ILITA:

Information and Technology Authority

INCB:

Israel National Cyber Bureau

ISA (Shabak שב”כ):

Israel Security Agency

IT:

Information technology

Kinneret :

Lake of Galilee

Maf’at:

The Ministry Of Defense Directorate For Defense Research And Development

Mekorot:

National Water Company

MCM:

Million cubic meters

NCI:

National Cyber Initiative

NCSA:

(Rashut Le’umit le-Haganat ha-Cyber רשות לאומית להגנת הסייבר) National Cyber Security Authority

NISA:

(Re’em) National Information Security Authority

NSA:

National Security Agency

PLC:

Programmable logic controller

SCADA:

Supervisory control and data acquisition

Shodan:

Web Search Engine for Finding Interconnected Devices

USB:

Universal Serial Bus

WWW:

World Wide Web

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Tabansky, L. (2017). Cyber Security Challenges: The Israeli Water Sector Example. In: Clark, R., Hakim, S. (eds) Cyber-Physical Security. Protecting Critical Infrastructure, vol 3. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32824-9_10

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