Skip to main content

Tools of Russian Influence: Information and Propaganda

Abstract

On February 25, 2014, Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov appeared on media, claiming “We have confirmed our principled position to not interfere in Ukraine`s internal affairs and expect all [foreign powers] to follow a similar logic.”1 In Simferopol, 36 hours later, armed and masked men broke into the Crimean parliament.2 This was the start of a Russian assault on Ukrainian territory, and in the following days, “small green men” seized control over the Crimean peninsula.

Keywords

  • Foreign Policy
  • Political Communication
  • Foreign Minister
  • Baltic State
  • Soft Power

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-32530-9_9
  • Chapter length: 28 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   89.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-32530-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   169.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Bibliography

  • Andrew, Christopher, and Oleg Gordievsky. 1991. KGB: The Inside Story of Its Foreign Operations from Lenin to Gorbachev. London: Sceptre.

    Google Scholar 

  • Asmus, Ronald D. 2010. A Little War that Shook the World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Campbell, Alastair. 2007. The Blair Years—Extracts from the Alastair Campbell Diaries. London: Hutchinson.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dailey, Brian D., and Patrick J. Parker, eds. 1987. Soviet Strategic Deception. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Danish Defence Intelligence Service. 2015. The DDIS Intelligence Risk Assessment 2015. Copenhagen: DDIS.

    Google Scholar 

  • Franke, Ulrik. 2015. War by Non-Military Means: Understanding Russian Information Warfare. Kista: SDRE.

    Google Scholar 

  • Giles, Keir, Philip Hanson, Roderic Lyne, James Nixey, James Sherr, and Andrew Wood. 2015. The Russian Challenge. London: RIIA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hill, Fiona. 2015. How Putin’s World View Shapes Foreign Policy. In Russia’s Foreign Policy, eds. David Cadier and Margot Light, 42–61. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jowett, Garth S., and Victoria O’Donnell. 2012. Propaganda and Persuasion. 5th ed. Los Angeles, CA: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Judah, Ben. 2013. Fragile Empire: How Russia Fell In and Out of Love with Vladimir Putin. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mitrokhin, Vasiliy. 2002. KGB Lexicon: The Soviet Intelligence Officer’s Handbook. London: Frank Cass.

    Google Scholar 

  • NATO. 2014. Analysis of Russia’s Information Campaign Against Ukraine. Riga: NATO StratCom Centre of Excellence.

    Google Scholar 

  • ———. 2015. The Manipulative Techniques of Russia’s Information Campaign. Riga: NATO StratCom Centre of Excellence.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nimmo, Ben. 2015. Anatomy of an Info-war: How Russia’s Propaganda Machine Works, and How to Counter It. Bratislava: Central European Policy Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  • Norwegian Police Security Service. 2015. Annual Threat Assessment 2015. Oslo: NPSS.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nye, Joseph. 2004. Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics. New York: Public Affairs.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Keefe, Daniel J. 2002. Persuasion: Theory and Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pacepa, Ion M., and Ronald J. Rychlak. 2013. Disinformation. Washington, DC: WND Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pomerantsev, Peter. 2015. Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible. London: Faber and Faber.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pomerantsev, Peter, and Michael Weiss. 2014. The Menace of Unreality: How the Kremlin Weaponizes Information, Culture and Money. New York: Institute of Modern Russia.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pratkanis, Anthony R., ed. 2007. The Science of Social Influence: Advances and Future Progress. New York: Psychology Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Risso, Linda. 2014. Propaganda and Intelligence in the Cold War: The NATO Information Service. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schoen, Fletcher, and Christopher J. Lamb. 2012. Deception, Disinformation, and Strategic Communications: How One Interagency Group Made a Major Difference. Washington, DC: National Defence University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • U.S. Department of State. 1987. Soviet Influence Activities: A Report on Active Measures and Propaganda, 1986–1987. Washington, DC: Department of State.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, Andrew. 2005. Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • ———. 2014. Ukraine Crisis. New Haven: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Winnerstig, Mike, ed. 2014. Tools of Destabilization: Russian Soft Power and Non-Military Influence in the Baltic States. Kista: SDRE.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2016 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Karlsen, G.H. (2016). Tools of Russian Influence: Information and Propaganda. In: Haaland Matlary, J., Heier, T. (eds) Ukraine and Beyond . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-32530-9_9

Download citation