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A Review of the Literature

  • Vassili Joannidès de Lautour
Chapter
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Abstract

As the previous three chapters drew on the lessons the history of capitalism, accounting and religion can teach to contemporary accounting, this chapter reviews the existing literature on the subject. Whilst literature reviews tend to be descriptive and give a snapshot of knowledge on a subject, this chapter sets out to provide the reader with a clear overview of how debates have evolved and knowledge has been advanced. Pursuant of this objective, it first highlights what is known and what needs knowing. It then shows how scholars’ religious affiliation influences the way they conduct research on accounting and religion.

Keywords

Religious Affiliation Religious Practice Religious Organisation Religious Institution Accounting Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vassili Joannidès de Lautour
    • 1
  1. 1.Grenoble École de ManagementGrenobleFrance

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