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Towards Sustainable Communities: Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM) Model

Chapter

Abstract

The precautionary principle of sustainable development requires that conservation measures be developed prior to destruction of a resource. Development of a community-based cultural heritage resources management (COBACHREM) model aims to provide a point of departure for African cultural conservation, whereby production and consumption indicators of cultural heritage resources conservation are identified and isolated for montoring purposes. A focus on community is important because it is at grassroots level where people apply their socio-cultural and psycho-social behaviours and processes to interact with environments. People use their socio-cultural understanding of phenomena to interact with the environment. These characteristics make cultural values ubiquitous in all people-accessed and people-inhabited geographic spaces thus making people readily available assets and mediums through which environmental sustainability can be implemented.

Keywords

COBACHREM Sustainable communities Cultural competence Cultural knowledge Cultural heritage indicators CBNRM 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I am indebted to village communities whose sharing of knowledge continues to nurture my knowledge, understanding and analysis of issues surrounding cultural resources conservation use and their transformation into cultural heritage in the contemporary world.

© 2013 by the author; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This chapter is an open access chapter distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Okavango Research InstituteUniversity of BotswanaMaunBotswana

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