Long Single-Molecule Reads Can Resolve the Complexity of the Influenza Virus Composed of Rare, Closely Related Mutant Variants

  • Alexander Artyomenko
  • Nicholas C. Wu
  • Serghei Mangul
  • Eleazar Eskin
  • Ren Sun
  • Alex Zelikovsky
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-31957-5_12

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9649)
Cite this paper as:
Artyomenko A., Wu N.C., Mangul S., Eskin E., Sun R., Zelikovsky A. (2016) Long Single-Molecule Reads Can Resolve the Complexity of the Influenza Virus Composed of Rare, Closely Related Mutant Variants. In: Singh M. (eds) Research in Computational Molecular Biology. RECOMB 2016. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 9649. Springer, Cham

Abstract

As a result of a high rate of mutations and recombination events, an RNA-virus exists as a heterogeneous “swarm” of mutant variants. The long read length offered by single-molecule sequencing technologies allows each mutant variant to be sequenced in a single pass. However, high error rate limits the ability to reconstruct heterogeneous viral population composed of rare, related mutant variants. In this paper, we present 2SNV, a method able to tolerate the high error-rate of the single-molecule protocol and reconstruct mutant variants. 2SNV uses linkage between single nucleotide variations to efficiently distinguish them from read errors. To benchmark the sensitivity of 2SNV, we performed a single-molecule sequencing experiment on a sample containing a titrated level of known viral mutant variants. Our method is able to accurately reconstruct clone with frequency of 0.2 % and distinguish clones that differed in only two nucleotides distantly located on the genome. 2SNV outperforms existing methods for full-length viral mutant reconstruction. The open source implementation of 2SNV is freely available for download at http://alan.cs.gsu.edu/NGS/?q=content/2snv.

Keywords

SMRT reads RNA viral variants Single nucleotide variation 

Supplementary material

420109_1_En_12_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (814 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (pdf 813 KB)

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander Artyomenko
    • 1
  • Nicholas C. Wu
    • 2
  • Serghei Mangul
    • 3
  • Eleazar Eskin
    • 3
  • Ren Sun
    • 4
  • Alex Zelikovsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Integrative Structural and Computational BiologyThe Scripps Research InstituteLa JollaUSA
  3. 3.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Molecular and Medical PharmacologyUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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