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Introduction

  • Dirk F. Moore
Chapter
Part of the Use R! book series (USE R)

Abstract

Survival analysis is the study of survival times and of the factors that influence them. Types of studies with survival outcomes include clinical trials, prospective and retrospective observational studies, and animal experiments. Examples of survival times include time from birth until death, time from entry into a clinical trial until death or disease progression, or time from birth to development of breast cancer (that is, age of onset). The survival endpoint can also refer a positive event. For example, one might be interested in the time from entry into a clinical trial until tumor response. Survival studies can involve estimation of the survival distribution, comparisons of the survival distributions of various treatments or interventions, or elucidation of the factors that influence survival times. As we shall see, many of the techniques we study have analogues in generalized linear models such as linear or logistic regression.

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Survival Analysis Survival Distribution Advanced Gastric Cancer Patient Random Censoring 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dirk F. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiostatisticsRutgers School of Public HealthPiscatawayUSA

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