Infrared Atmospheric Emission

Chapter
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

Emission of a flat layer, consisting of a gas with a weakly varied temperature in the perpendicular direction to the layer, is reduced to the case of the layer with a constant temperature. The average optical thickness of the Earth’s atmosphere in an infrared spectrum range is \(u\approx 2.7\) and is determined on the basis of the energetic balance of the Earth and its atmosphere within the framework of the standard atmosphere model due to emission and surviving of infrared photons. It is shown that infrared emission of the atmosphere is determined mostly by atmospheric water. One can separate the flux of outgoing infrared radiation of the atmosphere from that towards the Earth. The fluxes due to rotation-vibration transitions of atmospheric \(CO_2\) molecules are evaluated. Doubling of the concentration of \(CO_2\) molecules in the atmosphere that is expected over 130 years leads to an increase of the average Earth temperature by \((0.4 \pm 0.2) \) K mostly due to the flux towards the Earth if other atmospheric parameters are not varied. Various models with a water change give the temperature change \((3.0\pm 1.5) \) K at doubling of the \(CO_2\) molecule concentration. An observed temperature change (\(0.8\,^{\circ }\mathrm{C}\)) during the industrial epoch may be realized if approximately \(0.5\,\%\) of free water molecules become aerosols, and this testifies to an atmospheric instability.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for High TemperaturesRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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