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Paradoxes of Building Back Better

  • Alexandra Jayeun LeeEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications book series (ASTSA)

Abstract

The spectacle of a disaster produces an outpouring of event-specific neologisms that can also impede effective communication across its many stakeholders. This presents multiple problems where recovery efforts require coordination of multiple stakeholders.

Keywords

Disaster Management Cognitive Dissonance Wicked Problem Disaster Recovery Indian Ocean Tsunami 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.RichmondUSA

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