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Haemorrhagic Vascular Pathologies: Imaging for Haemorrhagic Stroke

  • James V. ByrneEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This tutorial will cover the types of intracranial haemorrhage, their appearances on CT and MRI and their causes. The term haemorrhagic stroke is used to distinguish acute bleeding from brain dysfunction due to ischaemic stroke and cerebral infarction. Stroke is a common reason for scanning patients and the most likely reason for a patient with spontaneous intracranial bleeding being referred for imaging. Teaching will focus on this indication but include other causes of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage and the diagnosis (or exclusion) of a causative vascular pathology.

Keyword

Stroke Intracranial haemorrhage Intracerebral haemorrhage Subarachnoid haemorrhage Subdural haemorrhage Brain CT Brain MRI CT angiogram Digital subtraction angiogram MR angiogram 

References

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Suggestions for Further Reading

  1. Fink JN, Caplan LR (2003) The importance of specific diagnosis in stroke patient management. Magnetic resonance imaging in Stroke. Davis S, Fisher M, Warach S (eds), Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Moritani T, Ekholm S, Westesson PL (2009) Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the brain. Springer, Berlin, HeidelbergCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Warlow CP (1996) Stroke. A practical guide to management. Blackwell Science, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nuffield Department of Surgical SciencesOxford University, West Wing, John Radcliffe HospitalOxfordUK

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