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Pleasure in Pain: How Accumulation in Gaming Systems Can Lead to Grief

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Gamer Psychology and Behavior

Abstract

This chapter applies the concepts of regulatory focus and regulatory fit into gaming structures and articulates their effects especially inside massively multiplayer games to understand the behavior of players inside gaming structures, as well as emotional transitions associated with them.

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Correspondence to Selcen Ozturkcan Ph.D. .

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Ozturkcan, S., Sengun, S. (2016). Pleasure in Pain: How Accumulation in Gaming Systems Can Lead to Grief. In: Bostan, B. (eds) Gamer Psychology and Behavior. International Series on Computer Entertainment and Media Technology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29904-4_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29904-4_3

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