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Fixed Base Modal Testing Using the NASA GRC Mechanical Vibration Facility

  • Lucas D. Staab
  • James P. Winkel
  • Vicente J. Suárez
  • Trevor M. Jones
  • Kevin L. NapolitanoEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

The Space Power Facility at NASA’s Plum Brook Station houses the world’s largest and most powerful space environment simulation facilities, including the Mechanical Vibration Facility (MVF), which offers the world’s highest-capacity multi-axis spacecraft shaker system. The MVF was designed to perform sine vibration testing of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)-class spacecraft with a total mass of 75,000 lb, center of gravity (cg) height above the table of 284 in., diameter of 18 ft, and capability of 1.25 g pk in the vertical and 1.0 g pk in the lateral directions. The MVF is a six-degree-of-freedom, servohydraulic, sinusoidal base-shake vibration system that has the advantage of being able to perform single-axis sine vibration testing of large structures in the vertical and two lateral axes without the need to reconfigure the test article for each axis. This paper discusses efforts to extend the MVF’s capabilities so that it can also be used to determine fixed base modes of its test article without the need for an expensive test-correlated facility simulation.

Keywords

Modal testing Vibrations Base-shake Environmental testing Fixed base 

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Copyright information

© The Society of Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucas D. Staab
    • 1
  • James P. Winkel
    • 1
  • Vicente J. Suárez
    • 1
  • Trevor M. Jones
    • 1
  • Kevin L. Napolitano
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.NASA Glenn Research CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.ATA Engineering, Inc.San DiegoUSA

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