Stress Waves Propagating Through Bolted Joints

  • R. C. Flicek
  • K. J. Moore
  • G. M. Castelluccio
  • M. R. W. Brake
  • T. Truster
  • C. I. Hammetter
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

This paper examines the mechanical response of a simple bolted joint, the Brake–Reu\(\ss\) beam, under shock loading. This is done by creating a high-fidelity finite element model of the beam and subjecting it to a quasi-static bolt load followed by a dynamic shock load. The influence of several parameters on the beam’s response is studied, which include impact force, impact duration, impact location, and residual stress. The results indicate that when the energy input into the beam is held constant, the most influential parameter is the shock’s frequency and that increasing its frequency significantly increases dissipation. The next most influential parameter is the impact location, though its effect is frequency dependent and becomes stronger for higher frequencies. Finally, the results show that while residual stresses can significantly modify the contact-pressure distribution, they have minimal influence on the energy dissipated due to friction resulting from shock loading.

Keywords

Bolted joints Interfacial mechanics Frictional dissipation Wave propagation Dynamic contact 

References

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Flicek
    • 1
  • K. J. Moore
    • 2
  • G. M. Castelluccio
    • 3
  • M. R. W. Brake
    • 3
  • T. Truster
    • 4
  • C. I. Hammetter
    • 3
  1. 1.Akima Infrastructure Servicesunder contract to Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical Science and EngineeringUniversity of Illinois Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA
  3. 3.Sandia National Laboratories†AlbuquerqueUSA
  4. 4.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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