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Energy pp 321-362 | Cite as

Energy Storage

  • Yaşar Demirel
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Devices or physical media can store some form of energy to perform a useful operation at a later time or at a different location. Energy storage reduces the mismatches between the energy production and demand. For example, if it is stored the solar energy would still be available during the night. Also, the stored energy may be a supplement during the peak demand for energy. Besides, a stored energy can be transported. A battery, for example, makes it possible to use a wristwatch, mobile phone, or a laptop computer. This chapter begins by underlying the importance of energy storage and regulation by water and hydrogen and later discusses thermal, electric, chemical, and mechanical energy storage systems. Solar energy storage by sensible and/or latent heat and for short- and long-term applications is discussed briefly. Some common phase changing materials and usage of them for the latent heat storage technique are described. Underground thermal energy systems are discussed briefly. Capacitor, hydroelectric, and battery are discussed in storing electricity. Chemical energy storage by biosynthesis is briefly discussed. Later, mechanical energy storage by compressed air, flywheel, hydraulic, and springs are discussed.

Keywords

Phase Change Material Heat Storage Solar Collector Thermal Energy Storage Heat Transfer Fluid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Nebraska LincolnLincolnUSA

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