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Energy pp 35-71 | Cite as

Energy Sources

  • Yaşar Demirel
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Energy has far-reaching impact in everyday life, technology and development. Primary energy sources are extracted or captured directly from the environment, while the secondary energy sources are derived from the primary energy sources, for example, in the form of electricity or fuel. Primary energies are nonrenewable energy (fossil fuels), renewable energy, and waste.

Keywords

Renewable Energy Corn Stover Solar Collector High Heating Value Lower Heating Value 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Nebraska LincolnLincolnUSA

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