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Sunscreen Formulation: Optimising Aesthetic Elements for Twenty-First-Century Consumers

Abstract

This chapter discusses the optimum aesthetic properties for modern sun care products, how different types of UV filters influence these aesthetic properties and what formulators can do to optimise the cosmetic appeal of their sun care formulations. The focus is on formulation of emulsion-based products, as this remains the predominant format for sun protection products globally.

Many UV filters present formulation challenges in terms of skin feel and also, in the case of inorganic sunscreens, the visual appearance of the product on skin. However, judicious choice of both actives and excipients, together with some novel ingredients and technologies now available, enable formulators to develop products that are both effective and elegant.

Keywords

  • Aesthetic Property
  • Magnesium Aluminium Silicate
  • Sunscreen Product
  • Sunscreen Formulation
  • Alkyl Benzoate

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Julian P. Hewitt .

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Hewitt, J.P. (2016). Sunscreen Formulation: Optimising Aesthetic Elements for Twenty-First-Century Consumers. In: Wang, S., Lim, H. (eds) Principles and Practice of Photoprotection. Adis, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29382-0_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29382-0_16

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